French Knot

Category :

Embroidery

The elegant French knots are often seen on embroidered table linens and curtains while the same knotted pattern is quite common in accessories like bracelets and cufflinks.

Picture of French Knot

It is quite natural for beginner embroiderers to become nervous by the mere name of this needlepoint embroidery technique. The knotty stitch is quite tricky to work, and you are more likely to end up with a tangled thread on your needle unless you are a true proficient. However, learning and practicing the embroidery is the only way to master it. So, go on and make some knots using the directions given below.

French Knot Step-by-Step Instructions

First, you need to mark the spots where you want to make your French knots.

String your embroidery needle with the thread of your chosen color. Make a tiny knot at its end to prevent the thread from running through the fabric you are working on.

Step 1: Pull the needle through the point where you want to make the French knot. The thread should be long enough for you to be able to point the needle back at the thread.

Step 2: Then hold the needle in your left hand (right hand in case you are left-hander) at the back of the thread and use your other hand to wrap the thread tightly around the needle.

Step 3: Next, poke the needle back through the fabric, close to the spot you pulled it through earlier. Make sure to keep a firm hold on the thread with your finger. The following diagram shows the second and third steps:

French Knot Tutorial Picture

Step 4: Pull the needle all the way through at the back of the fabric, gently releasing the hold on the thread. Once the thread passes through to the back of the fabric, you will be left with a basic French knot on the right side of the embroidery.

The neat knots are perfect for making small embroidered flowers, cute dotted patterns and stylish accessories. The technique is used for decorating hand-knit accessories as well as making the eyes and nose of handmade dolls and crocheted amigurumi toys.

French Knot Designs Images French Knot Stitch Photos

Pictures of French Knot Amigurumi Images of French Knot Headband

Now that you know the method for working the French knot, you can go ahead and do some experiment with the stitch. Make designer appliqués and buttons or work intriguing patterns on jackets and cardigans. French knot also looks amazing when combined with cross stitch designs while a variation – gathered French knot – is great for making pretty little ribbon roses and other patterns.

Photos of French Knot Embroidery Pattern Image of French Knot Embroidery

References:

http://www.holiday-crafts-and-creations.com/french-knot.html

http://www.feelingstitchy.com/2007/06/french-knot.html

http://www.purlbee.com/embroidery-tutorials/2007/7/20/french-knot.html

http://www.embroidery.rocksea.org/stitch/knots/french-knot/

By  February 10th 2014

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