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Broomstick Lace Crochet

The broomstick lace, also known as the peacock eye crochet or jiffy lace is one of the oldest crochet techniques in use from as early as the 19th century. As the name suggests, actual broomsticks were used originally to create the intricate design of a broomstick lace. But in modern crocheting, a dowel pin or a dowel is used for the same purpose. How to crochet the broomstick lace The complicated twisted design makes the pattern look quite intriguing, while in truth it is pretty simple pattern, suitable even for beginner crocheters. Apart from the crochet hook, the pattern calls for a dowel or a large size knitting needle (size 50 works well). Here are the step by step directions: Step 1 First, chain 21 before making a single crochet (sc) in every chain starting from the second chain. You will have a single crochet foundation row with 20 sc. The pattern is worked with groups of five stitches at once, so the number of sc on your foundation row should be a multiple of 5. Step 2 Once you …

Entrelac Knitting

Entrelac is primarily a knitting technique that produces a complex basket weave texture on the knit fabric. But, the pattern can also be worked using crochet hooks. The word ‘Entrelac’ has a French origin (entrelacer), meaning ‘to interlace’ or intertwine – to be woven together.

Brick Stitch

Brick stitch, a popular beading technique, resembles the peyote beading in procedure; but unlike the latter, the beading columns produced by brick stitch are turned sideways. It is named after the pattern of the off-set bead rows that resemble a brick wall.

Chain Stitch

Chain stitch is one of the most versatile needlepoint embroidery techniques with numerous uses. As the name suggests, the chain stitch produces thick embroidered lines that resembles chains. The complex appearance of this stitch may justly scare beginner embroiderers. But in truth, they are not as difficult to make. There are several ways to work the needle to produce the chained pattern; this article discuses the easiest one of these methods.

Quilt Binding

Quilting is a fun way of joining small pieces of multicolored fabrics to produce vibrant combinations that add to the décor of your home, complimenting your craftsmanship. But, making a binding for your quilt can be quite a tricky job. From finding out the grain of the fabric and deciding which type of binding would look the best on your quilt to actually making the binding – there is plenty to do. Here is a basic step-by-step instruction to make it easier for you to bind your quilt next time. Types of Quilt Binding Lengthwise grain binding is characterized by threads running straight along the length of the binding that end parallel to the quilt’s edges. The main disadvantage of this binding is that one weak or broken thread could split the entire binding on one side. Crosswise grain binding strips are less breakage prone as the threads do not run the entire sides of the binding. So, any broken thread only runs a short distance until it reaches the seam of the binding. Bias quilt binding is the most …

French Knot

The elegant French knots are often seen on embroidered table linens and curtains while the same knotted pattern is quite common in accessories like bracelets and cufflinks.

Kitchener Stitch

Kitchener stitch, an easy grafting technique, is a popular choice for joining two sides of knitted fabric while hand-knitting woolen garments. This stitch allows you to accomplish both the steps of binding off and seaming the edges of your fabric at once. It is ideal for joining the toes of a sock or the hooded top of a jacket as the seam produced by the kitchener resembles the knitted stitches, keeping the join invisible.

Garter Stitch

One of the basic stitches used in knitting, the garter stitch, is ideal for beginner knitters and can be used for making hats, scarves, blankets, shawls, sweaters and Afghans. Garter is quite easy to learn as it involves only knit stitches and no purl. Both the right and wrong sides of  fabric knitted with garter stitch are identical, characterized by horizontal ridges created by the knitted loops with every two rows facing each other.

Potato Chip Scarf

The unique curly design and complex pattern of the potato chip scarf makes it look quite intimidating when it comes to making one yourself. But, the best thing about this beautiful scarf is how easy it is to knit or crochet one at home. Here are the step-by-step instructions both for knitting and crocheting the cascading potato chip scarf.

Bobbin

Bobbin is a useful tool generally found within various electronic equipment as well as in cameras and sewing machines. The following article discusses about the bobbin used in sewing machines.

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Knitting

Entrelac Knitting

Entrelac is primarily a knitting technique that produces a complex basket weave texture on the knit fabric. But, the pattern can also ...

Lace

Broomstick Lace Crochet

The broomstick lace, also known as the peacock eye crochet or jiffy lace is one of the oldest crochet techniques in use ...